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zodiacmind:

Fun facts about your sign here

zodiacmind:

Fun facts about your sign here

Long Live the New Flesh | Rebecca Tivey

thatlitsite:

image

1983: the beginning of the video wars. As home VCR players became more affordable, Sony’s Betamax and JVC’s VHS slogged it out to be the chosen format of viewers worldwide. Only one would win. But eventually both would lose.

David Cronenberg’s Videodrome (1983) is very much a product of its time. A cable network executive’s forays into disturbing late night broadcasts take a sinister turn when the dividing screen between fiction and reality begins to melt away. Unlike our wireless, invisible consumption of media today, it is the physical object of the video cassette which becomes an important trope in Videodrome. Cronenberg uses the oppressive nature of the bulky, noisy hardware to create a sense of claustrophobia. Harlan’s backroom office, for instance, is crowded with blinking screens and players restricting the space the two men physically inhabit.

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thedsgnblog:

Design Studio of the week (08/09/2014):

Grupa    |    http://grupaproducts.com    |    Facebook

GRUPA is a multi-disciplinary design studio founded in 2006 by product designers Filip Despot, Tihana Gotovuša and Ivana Pavić in Zagreb, Croatia. 

They had an idea - to don’t let anything to a chance and involve themselves in development of their products from the drawing board to the moment they ship it to their clients. The result is products that they fully stand behind. Products that go trough their hands every step of the way and today they are proud to be part of peoples living and working spaces - homes, offices, hotels, bars etc.

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professorfangirl:

Bad news: my friend Tony Heald’s not going to be able to teach with me this fall. Good news: it’s because he’s been cast in the revival of The Elephant Man with Bradley Cooper. This fuckin play, man. One of the best meditations on embodiment ever. It’s based on the life of Joseph Merrick, a man horribly deformed by a congenital disorder they still haven’t determined; he was displayed in sideshows until Dr. Frederick Treves had him installed in London Hospital. Bernard Pomerance’s play doesn’t foruc on the deformity, though, but on the issue of human dignity. “The playwright specified that no special makeup or prosthesis be used to portray Merrick… When the performance begins and we first see Merrick, Bradley Cooper stands tall, unaffected. A slide show with images of the actual Merrick are displayed and as each growth and disfigurement is described, Cooper’s stance changes to reflect the malady. Within just minutes the actor becomes, and then maintains, his character….” (x)

In other words, it’s as if Treve’s description causes the deformity to appear in Merrick’s. Talk about medical discourse constructing bodies. (And the contrast between Cooper’s beauty—Sexiest Man Alive 2011, y’all—and Merrick’s deformity really puts pressure on the scopophilic compulsion. Which body fascinates us more, in the end?)

disneypixar:

In good hands.

disneypixar:

In good hands.

(via uwuc)

beatlesforeverandever:

Skater John

beatlesforeverandever:

Skater John

(via uwuc)

(Source: onminimalism)